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GuamBoonie

Guam Boonie Seeds

Size

NEW! A Pepper Joe's special hot pepper rarity! PJ's Guam Boonie peppers come from a Guamanian friend. These super tasty gems come from a long tradition in Guam. 

The attraction of the Guam Boonie is its heat. It can be very intense at first and then evens out and lingers on your tongue and lips which can last for a while (about four to seven times longer than a jalapeno).  It can also cause a little numbness. There's definitely a lot of tingling going on. Another attribute of the Boonie is that its heat can be amplified by crushing them (using a mortar and pestle or a small bowl and the back of a spoon). The heat tends to also bring out the sweetness in foods. So what hits your palate first is the heat, then sweet followed by the other flavors of the dish giving a greater depth to your flavor profiles when used correctly. Guamanians do not usually dry these peppers, they prefer them fresh. If not fresh, then frozen and maybe as a last resort, in a paste.

To grow Boonie Peppers, the plants like lots of sunlight, growing space, mild to very warm temperatures, and humidity.  They easily die in the cold.  But once the fruit is harvested, it can easily be kept fresh longer by freezing with the stems on. Take them out of the freezer and leave them on the counter until they reach room temperature and they are almost as good as fresh. 

The Boonie Pepper is a relative of the Thai Bird Chile and Malagueta/Malaga Bird Pepper.  While they are similar in looks, they are distinctly different peppers in heat and taste.  These peppers are like coffee beans.  While most look the same, their taste differs depending on the climate, soil, and growing conditions. The Thai Chili tends to be more on the "sweeter" side, meaning less heat and a more subtle flavor than the Guam  Boonie.  The Malagueta comes close to heat but its effects are not as long-lasting.  

Species:Capsicum Chinense

Heat Level: 16,000-40,000 SHUs 

Type: Medium

Origin: Guam 

Days to Harvest: 70+ Days

Seeds per Packet: 10+ Pepper Seeds 

Love exotic peppers? Find the perfect exotic and novelty peppers for you.

Customer Reviews

Based on 4 reviews
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E
Ed
What ARE these?

Are these Boonie or are they Bonnie?
Boonie peppers or Bonnie peppers?
Someone commented that these are not Bonnie peppers, which, according to the label, these are Boonie peppers, instead. But was that a spelling error? I’m confused.

M
Mike
Bonnie Peppers

These peppers are NOT Bonnie peppers.. Bonnie Peppers are long and slender about,1 1/2 inches long.

S
Sarah
Too hot here?

I had great germination, but the plants couldn’t withstand a Central Valley summer. The humidity in the garden is easily double that of the general area, but that’s still only around 40%.
I’m going to try starting them earlier next season, like January or early February, to see if they fare better when they’re older before the heat really hits.
I really hope to get them to grow and set fruit here because they’ve got great flavor and good heat for every day eating.

J
Josh nestor
Great Guam boonie peppers

I used to live in Guam, so when I saw pepper joes selling seeds I jumped on it. I live in Michigan now so I don’t know if that has something to do with it but my boonie peppers are purple, never the less they are great boonie peppers, taste great and a lot of heat, I will definitely be getting more seeds from pepper joes. Bty all 20 of my seeds sprouted

Customer Reviews

Based on 4 reviews Write a review